Biology

Microcontact printing of biomolecular gratings from SU-8 masters duplicated by Thermal Soft UV NIL

Abstract

Thermal Soft UV nanoimprint lithography (NIL) was performed to replicate nanostructures in SU-8 resist. The SU-8 resist was structured with a PDMS stamp molded against an original silicon master which comported gratings of lines (500 nm width/1 μm pitch). The patterns obtained in SU-8 were used in a second step as a template for PDMS molding of daughter stamps. Pattern transfer quality and dimension control were achieved on these second generation PDMS stamps using AFM measurements. As a final validation of the whole duplication processes, these second generation PDMS stamps were finally employed to perform μCP of streptavidin molecules on a glass slide activated by plasma O2 treatment. AFM observation and fluorescence microscopy reveal that molecular patterns produced with SU8-molded PDMS stamps are not discernable from those obtained with a PDMS stamp directly molded on the original silicon master. Coupling Thermal Soft UV NIL and microcontact printing opens a new method for generating a large quantity of SU-8 templates on which functional PDMS stamps can be replicated in a reduced time. We thus propose a functional duplication process for soft-lithography implementation which may further reduce the cost of this technology for industrial development.

Lien

Microcontact printing of biomolecular gratings from SU-8 masters duplicated by Thermal Soft UV NIL

Nanotopographic Control of Neuronal Polarity

Abstract

We employ simple geometrical rules to design a set of nanotopographies able to interfere with focal adhesion establishment during neuronal differentiation. Exploiting nanoimprint lithography techniques on cyclic-olefin-copolymer films, we demonstrate that by varying a single topographical parameter the orientation and maturation of focal adhesions can be finely modulated yielding independent control over the final number and the outgrowth direction of neurites. Taken together, this report provides a novel and promising approach to the rational design of biocompatible textured substrates for tissue engineering applications.

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Nanotopographic Control of Neuronal Polarity

Microchannel-patterned and heparin micro-contact-printed biodegradable composite membranes for tissue-engineering applications

Abstract

Microchannel-patterned starch–poly(capro-lactone)/hydydroxyapatite (SPCL–HA) and starch–poly(lactic acid) (SPLA) composite membranes were produced for use as a laminated tissue-engineering scaffold that incorporates both physical and biochemical patterns. For this purpose, SPCL (30% starch) blended with inorganic hydroxyl apatite (50%) and SPLA (50% starch) membranes were made with compressive moulding. Consequently, the microchannel structures (width 102 µm, 174 µm intervals) were developed on the composite membranes by means of micro-patterned metal mould(s) and hydraulic pressing. An elastomer poly(dimetylsiloxane) stamp was used to transfer heparin as a biochemical cue over the microchannel surfaces by micro-contact printing (µCP). Toluidine blue staining of developed capillaries and heparin µCP-coated membranes showed that heparin was transferred predominantly over the microchannel surfaces. Fibroblast cell culture over the microchannel-formed and heparin µCP-modified SPCL–HA and SPLA membranes showed distinct growth patterns. In contrast to the uniform cell layer formed on unmodified microchannels, the cells were bridging across the grooves of heparin-printed microchannels. At extended culture periods, the heparin-printed microchannels were covered with a layer of fibroblast cells without cellular ingrowths inside. This study indicated that the topographical pattern could induce an organization of fibroblasts only with the biochemical cue and the cells' functions can be controlled spatially over the microchannels by using both cues.

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Microchannel-patterned and heparin micro-contact-printed biodegradable composite membranes for tissue-engineering applications

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