Biology

Proliferation capacity of cord blood derived neural stem cell line on different micro-scale biofunctional domains

Abstract

Physical interactions of cells with the adhesive substrates of the microenvironment as well as the presence of the soluble growth factors are important for the proliferation capacity of neural stem cells. We have used biofunctionalized surface domains microcontact printed with either synthetic polyaminoacid poly-L-lysine or extracellular matrix (ECM) component such as fibronectin, to study the proliferation capacity of human umbilical cord blood-derived neural stem cells (HUCB-NSC). The proliferation measured by the expression of Ki-67 protein was accompanied by the investigation of the cell morphology under the transmission and scanning electron microscopy in different culture time, plating densities of cells and medium condition (serum-free or 2% of FBS). The poly-L-lysine domains of defined micro-scale area promoted the presence of round, loosely attached Ki-67-positive cells, while fibronectin domains of the same size allowed appearance of flattened, strongly attached cells with more differentiated phenotype. These results were in agreement with the non-specific, electrostatic type of interaction between cell and substrate on poly-L-lysine and integrin receptor-mediated specific adhesion on fibronectin. In this report we have described in vitro culture conditions, which allow for immobilization of the non-differentiated and highly proliferating population of neural stem/progenitor cells to the biofunctionalized surface. The microarrays with bioactive domains allocating non-differentiated and proliferating neural stem/progenitor cells may find application for drug and chemicals toxicology screening of diverse factors influencing neural development.

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Proliferation capacity of cord blood derived neural stem cell line on different micro-scale biofunctional domains

Steering Cell Migration Using Microarray Amplification of Natural Directional Persistence

Abstract

Cell locomotion plays a key role in embryonic morphogenesis, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. Here we show that intermittent control of cell shape using microarrays can be used to amplify the natural directional persistence of cells and guide their continuous migration along preset paths and directions. The key to this geometry-based, gradient-free approach for directing cell migration is the finding that cell polarization, induced by the asymmetric shape of individual microarray islands, is retained as cells traverse between islands. Altering the intracellular signals involved in lamellipodia extension (Rac1), contractility (RhoA), and cell polarity (Cdc42) alters the speed of fibroblast migration on these micropatterns but does not affect their directional bias significantly. These results provide insights into the role of cell morphology in directional movement and the design of micropatterned materials for steering cellular traffic.

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Steering Cell Migration Using Microarray Amplification of Natural Directional Persistence

Multiwalled Carbon-Nanotube-Functionalized Microelectrode Arrays Fabricated by Microcontact Printing: Platform for Studying Chemical and Electrical Neuronal Signaling

Abstract

A facile method is proposed for the deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) layers onto microelectrode arrays by means of a microcontact printing technique, leading to the fabrication of MEAs characterized by well defined electrical and morphological properties. Using polydimethyl siloxane stamps, produced from different mold designs, a flexibility of printing is achieved that provides access to microscale, nanostructured electrodes. The thickness of MWCNT layers can be exactly predetermined by evaluating the concentration of the MWCNT solution employed in the process. The electrode morphology is further characterized using laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy. Next, by means of impedance spectroscopy analysis, the MWCNT–electrode contact resistance and MWCNT film resistance is measured, while electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is used to estimate the obtained electrode–electrolyte interface. Structural and electrochemical properties make these electrodes suitable for electrical stimulation and recording of neurons and electrochemical detection of dopamine. MWCNT-functionalized electrodes show the ability to detect micromolar amounts of dopamine with a sensitivity of 19 nA μm−1. In combination with their biosensing properties, preliminary electrophysiological measurements show that MWCNT microelectrodes have recording properties superior to those of commercial TiN microelectrodes when detecting neuronal electrical activity under long-term cell-culture conditions. MWCNT-functionalized microelectrode arrays fabricated by microcontact printing represent a versatile and multipurpose platform for cell-culture monitoring.

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Multiwalled Carbon-Nanotube-Functionalized Microelectrode Arrays Fabricated by Microcontact Printing: Platform for Studying Chemical and Electrical Neuronal Signaling

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